2.4 Props & States

1.props: properties are passed to a component and can hold any data

class User extends Component {
  render(){
    const user = this.props.data;
    this.props.onReady('I am ready!');
    return(
      <View>
        <Text>
          score: {this.props.score}
          type: {this.props.type}
          Name: {user.name}
          Age: {user.age}
        </Text>
      </View>
    );
  }
}
//dufaultProps
User.propTypes = { score: React.PropTypes.number };
User.defaultProps = { score: 0 };

var user = {name: 'foo', age: 21};
class Main extends Component {
  handleReady(str){
    console.log(str);
  }
  render(){
    return(
      <View>
        <User type="Dev" data={user} onReady={this.handleReady}/>
      </View>
    );
  }
}

2.state: State differs from props in that it is internal to the component.

class Timer extends Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    this.state = {count: 0};
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    let that = this;
    setInterval(function () {
      that.increase();
    }, 1000);
  }

  increase() {
    this.setState({count: this.state.count + 1});
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text>count: {this.state.count}</Text>
      </View>
    );
  }
}

class Main extends Component {
  render(){
    return(
      <View>
        <Timer/>
      </View>
    );
  }
}

3.props VS state

  • Use props to pass data and settings through the component tree.
  • Never modify this.props inside of a component; consider props immutable.
  • Use props to for event handlers to communicate with child components.
  • Use state for storing simple view state like wether or not drop-down options are visible.
  • Never modify this.state directly, use this.setstate instead.

4.Stateless Component

const Heading = ({title}) => <Text>{title}</Text>;

..
...
<Heading title="test title"/>
...
..

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